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Sitting Posture and Back pain - Spine Center of Texas
cervical radiculopathy, spine treatment, pain management
Cervical Radiculopathy
spinal cord injury and prevention
Understanding Spinal Cord Injuries and Prevention
cervical radiculopathy, spine treatment, pain management
Cervical Radiculopathy
spinal cord injury and prevention
Understanding Spinal Cord Injuries and Prevention
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Sitting Posture and Back pain

How Sitting too Much Might Be Causing Your Back Pain

Do you sit a lot? If you do, then you should be cautious and watch your sitting posture. Over the last couple of decades, the American job industry and workplace have changed a lot. Most of the time spent in a majority of workplaces is spent sitting down. Couple that with an evolving lifestyle, changing diets with over processed food and you are bound to develop a problem. One main problem that is plaguing the majority of office workers is back pain. Additionally, even at home, our sitting postures are rarely, as any spine doctor would recommend.

How to Keep Your Spine Healthy While Sitting

Because most of us spend most of our time sitting, it is imperative that we learn how to position ourselves properly. This will not only protect you from back pain, you will also be avoiding neck pain. When sitting, avoid hunching over or sliding too far down the seat base. Instead, align your head with your sitting bones. Secondly, do not sit for too long. Walking around is a good way to keep yourself active and to flex dormant muscles. Long sitting periods eventually lead to hunching as the body settles into a certain position.

Effects of Sitting for Long

The body is designed to move regularly. However, in America, the average daily sitting time is 10 hours! If you sit too much, you probably have pain in your neck and shoulders. Often, the cause is leaning forward while you are working at your desk, which strains your cervical vertebrae. Moreover, when you sit, you exert more pressure on your spine, which takes a toll on back health. Statistics show that 40% of those suffering from back pain spend too much time seated.

When you sit a lot, the disks in your back do not expand and contract as they do when you are in motion. This interferes with their ability to absorb nutrients and blood. Sitting compresses the disks, making them lose flexibility with time. Excessive sitting also increases the risk of your suffering from a herniated disk. If you have a sit-down job and are starting to have pain problems, do not ignore the problem. Visit the Spine Center of Texas and get help.